Published: Wed, June 13, 2018
Global News | By Stacy Ballard

British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote

British PM avoids Brexit defeat in knife-edge parliament vote

But after meeting Mrs May he told this paper: "I've been to see the prime minister and received important undertakings and made a decision to vote to give the prime minister the authority and freedom to negotiate the best deal she can".

In a day of drama, May's position seemed suddenly weaker when junior justice minister Phillip Lee, who has always been critical of the government's Brexit strategy, resigned and said he would vote against the government.

Phillip Lee accused the government of trying to limit parliament's role in shaping Britain's departure from the European Union and said the government's Brexit strategy was detrimental to the British people.

Two days of debate on the laws that will end Britain's European Union membership have crystallised long-running divisions within May's party about the best strategy for leaving the European Union, bringing to a head issues that will determine the relationship between the world's fifth-largest economy and its biggest trading bloc.

Earlier, a junior minister resigned to fight for a "meaningful vote" for MPs, saying the government was offering a "fake choice" between "a bad deal and no deal".

Man holds two people hostage in Paris
Shocking photos show police decked out in body armour with a local reporter warning of "an armed man". At least two people have reportedly been taken hostage in Paris , CNN affiliate BFMTV reported.


These were the words of a minister expecting to win the vote.

After the resignation of justice minister Phillip Lee, who said he could not support the government's position on Brexit, it was said government whips feared a Tory rebellion on the "meaningful vote" amendment passed by the House of Lords.

Despite many Conservative MPs who backed Remain in the referendum, just two rebelled against the government on a meaningful vote.

Britons voted 52 percent to 48 percent in favor of exiting the European Union in a June 2016 referendum.

But Tuesday's victory came at a cost - a government promise to strengthen Parliament's voice, potentially at the expense of its own power to set the terms of any final divorce deal with the EU.

Daniel Ricciardo hopes to avoid Canadian GP penalty
Verstappen says the deficit was bigger on high fuel in FP2, but is encouraged by the rest of Red Bull's performance so far. On the same tires Max Verstappen and Valtteri Bottas lost to Hamilton more than half a second.


The government has been criticised for not allowing time to debate the Irish border during a series of key Brexit votes at Westminster.

The final vote, as outlined in Grieve third point, would be different as the government would then have to follow any direction given by the Commons.

Theresa May saw off a revolt from the pro-European wing of her fractured party, averting what could have been a major political crisis.

The government was putting a combative spin on the concessions Tuesday evening: "The Brexit Secretary has set out three tests that any new amendment has to meet - not undermining the negotiations, not changing the constitutional role of Parliament and Government in negotiating worldwide treaties, and respecting the referendum result", a spokesperson for the Brexit department said in a statement.

The former attorney general said he expected two parts of his amendment to be taken on by the Government, stating: "The two parts provide the mechanism by which Parliament has to be consulted in the event of no deal and the Government come forward with a motion explaining what it will do".

Greek PM says Macedonia's name change will be universal
It is now known formally at the United Nations under the interim name "Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia ". He said that the accord would allow a clear distinction between Greece's Macedonia province and the country.


Matthew Pennycook, one of the opposition Labour Party's Brexit policy team, urged lawmakers to vote to hand parliament more powers.

Like this: