Published: Thu, October 19, 2017
Health Care | By Oscar Goodwin

United Kingdom police numbers show surge in hate crime

United Kingdom police numbers show surge in hate crime

"All evidence points to a rise in anti-Semitic and other hate crimes", said Board president Jonathan Arkush.

Provisional police figures show that the number of crimes, which increased after the Westminster Bridge attack, continued to climb until June as the Manchester Arena, London Bridge and Finsbury Park attacks followed.

The number of hate crime incidents recorded by British police forces reached a record monthly level of 6,000 incidents in June this year. The police have admitted that as well as better reporting, the number of hate crimes taking place has also gone up which means that in modern Britain more people are being victimised due to their race, religion, disability or sexuality.

The massive rise in reports but fall in prosecutions, recorded in the Crow Prosecution Serves' (CPS) Hate Crime Annual Report, could suggest some of the additional reports are less credible, meaning they do not make it to court.

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This peak was higher than the previous monthly peak of 5,500 in July 2016, seen in the aftermath of the referendum in favour of Briatain's exit or "Brexit" from the European Union (EU).

Hate crime in the United Kingdom has surged, with a record 80,393 offences recorded in 12 months to March 2017, according to Home Office figures released Tuesday.

Disability or transgender hate crimes increased by 53% and 45% respectively, but the majority of hate crimes were racially motivated.

However, the statistical analysis revealed a likely increase in crimes based on racial and religious hatred, showing particularly large spikes in the aftermath of the Brexit vote and of terror attacks in 2017.

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However, while Home Office data showed nearly 18,000 more hate crimes offences in the last 12 recorded months, the Board of Deputies said it was "concerned" that the number of successful prosecutions had fallen when anti-Semitism was rising.

"The Tories have made great claims about tackling burning injustices". United Kingdom police forms don't exclusively record incidents of hate as offences in themselves, but instead are also required to record when other offences - such as assault, property damage, or public disorder - are fuelled by hate, whether on the grounds of race, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

Reacting to the increase, the Home Secretary Amber Rudd said: "There is absolutely no place for hate crime in our society and this Government is taking action to tackle it".

The Campaign Against Anti-Semitism (CAA) said that of the 14,480 hate crimes prosecuted by the CPS a year ago, a "paltry" number were for anti-Semitism. In 2016-17, 52 per cent of cases involved "hostility on the grounds of race, religion, sexual orientation, disability or transgender identity". However, the overall number of the number of hate crime prosecutions was down from 15,542 in 2015-16 to 14,480 in 2016-17, while the number of cases referred to prosecutors increased slightly from 12,997 to 13,086.

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